Talk:Saturday Night Live

From Sajun.org

An event mentioned in this article is an October 11 selected anniversary.


As a matter of accuracy, I believe the music director was actually a gentleman by the name of Howard Shore, who played the incredible sax solos during the closing credits. I don't know the years of his tenure but he was there from the very first show as shown by visiting the transcripts site at http://snltranscripts.jt.org/75/75agoodnights.phtml (this is for the first show).

A bit of his 'pedigree': he was with a band from Canada in the late 60's and early 70's called Lighthouse; arguably the first rock 'n' roll orchestra, predating Electric Light Orchestra. Since then he has written several incredible movie soundtracks, including those for 'The Lord of the Rings'.

This one's for you, Howard. Love your work.

Ken Granger, Indianapolis, IN

=

What is the source for the following qualification? Every history of the show agrees that he clearly said "fuck."

"cast member Charles Rocket uttered the word "fuck" (he actually said "frig", but it could have been interpreted as "fuck") "


Copyvio impact

Why lock this article? Why not just revert to the last copyvio-free version? - Bevo 23:04, 5 May 2004 (UTC)

Is that procedure? Forgive me if that's the case, but I thought doing that would leave the copyvio in page history -- also not good. (As a matter of fact, the same editor dumped two big c&p copyvios here in rapid succession; I reverted the first one, then listed the second on the Copyvio page.) Hajor 23:11, 5 May 2004 (UTC)
Ok, it's now reverted to the "clean" 4 May version. Sorry for the cock-up. Hajor
Nothing to be sorry for! Good catch regarding the suspicious content. I didn't know the exact procedure either, but it turned out to be what I thought would be the case for copyvio process late in the life of an established article. You caught it almost immediately, and so helped keep us from having to redo subsequent edits. - Bevo 14:38, 6 May 2004 (UTC)

update

I think the information in this article needs an update. Most of it represents SNL in the 80s and early 90s (and even eariler?). Matt 10:29, 17 Jun 2004 (UTC)


What happened to the page? Acegikmo1 16:10, Jul 1, 2004 (UTC)

Sorry, I was under the impression that we actually did something about copyvios. -- Jim Regan 23:24, 5 Jul 2004 (UTC)

Why are there multiple links to the Al Franken page? All the other persons mentioned only got a single link each.


Is there a reason none of the names in the opening section are wikified? RadicalSubversiv E 07:17, 3 Oct 2004 (UTC)


Every Saturday Night?

The very first sentence seems possibly not true when it says it ran every Saturday night. Just a minor thing, but didn't it occasionally alternate with some wrestling show in the 80s or 90s? Spalding 16:34, Oct 11, 2004 (UTC)

OK, I started looking at the archive site, and the 87-88 season stopped in February and had only 13 shows compared to the usual 20, so I will try to find when it might have alternated with wrestling. Once I find it I guess it could go in the history section. Spalding 17:20, Nov 1, 2004 (UTC)

Conspiracy Theory Rock

I wanted to put this into the Trivia section but I'm at a loss, where do I put it and does it even fit there?

http://www.tvparty.com/unseenf.html

Cut from that page: It only aired once, and then was mysteriously cut out from that episode's rebroadcasts. NBC claimed it was pulled because it "wasn't funny," but that's the same excuse they gave when they canned Norm MacDonald. Instead of undermining the cartoon's joking around about NBC suppressing information and squashing dissent, it proved the point, instead.

View it here:

http://www.albinoblacksheep.com/video/conspiracy.php

JoeHenzi 01:33, 15 Oct 2004 (UTC)

Childeren's Television Series?

I didn't realize SNL should be categorized as a "children's" show...I could have sworn it was thouroughly adult...I don't think [[Category:Children's television series]] is appropriate...I am removing it...

Jon, Conqueror of Men 17:30, 20 Oct 2004 (UTC)

Audio Glitches

I just saw the oh-so-tragic (except probably not) audio glitch right before Ashlee Simpson was to perform. Is this an oddity? Has this happened a lot? Does it merit inclusion in the article, considering the show is live? Mike H 04:51, Oct 24, 2004 (UTC)

  • From what I hear, almost every artist uses backup tracks to reinforce his or her own voice (to make it sound more powerful or whatever). If you noticed, Eminem also used backup tracks the Saturday following Ashlee Simpson's "accident." There were a few moments at which you could hear his voice loud and clear, even though his mouth was closed and away from the microphone. The only difference between Ashlee Simpson and Eminem is that Eminem didn't do a silly dance and walk off the stage.
    • It's one of those insignificant events that somehow gains national attention. IMHO, leave it out of this article. Matt 23:24, 5 Nov 2004 (UTC)
    • I think that Eminem was only using it for that weird little screaming noise that was in "Just Lose It", which is understandable, since it's not something easily reproduced, I'm guessing. However, whether it was a backing track, a lipsync track, or what, the fact remains that Ashlee did a pisspoor job of being professional about the mixup. Whether it was a Milli Vanilli moment or not, she managed to make it look real bad. [[User:Mo0|Mo0[talk]]] 23:30, 5 Nov 2004 (UTC)

Order of Catch Phrases?

I can't see any means of order in these. I want to add one, so for now I'll just stick it at the end. Spalding 17:29, Nov 1, 2004 (UTC)